Red Sox to Host Cure Alzheimer’s Fund on June 5th

On Tuesday, June 5th, the Boston Red Sox will host Cure Alzheimer’s Fund at the team’sDeDUDq-U0AA00ne game against the Detroit Tigers to raise awareness about the disease and efforts to identify effective treatment and prevention strategies.

“We’re grateful to the Red Sox organization in helping us to highlight that research is currently being conducted that could lead to a cure or effective treatments,” said Barbara Chambers, Senior Vice President of Cure Alzheimer’s Fund.  “We realize that this is a special gift that provides us an opportunity to help educate Red Sox fans on how they can be a part of the fight to cure Alzheimer’s disease.”

The event will include a ceremony on the field at Fenway Park honoring researchers who are working to better understand and find a cure for Alzheimer’s disease; a color guard comprised of members of the Quincy Fire Department, who hold an annual event raising money funding research into the disease; and the first pitch to be thrown by Dr. Rudy Tanzi, who is the Vice-Chair and Director of the Genetics and Aging Research Unit at Massachusetts General Hospital and Chair of the Cure Alzheimer’s Fund Research Leadership Group.

Cure Alzheimer’s Fund is a non-profit dedicated to funding the most promising research to prevent, slow or reverse Alzheimer’s disease.  In 2017, Cure Alzheimer’s Fund distributed $15.7 million in research grants to 67 projects around the world. Since its founding in 2004, Cure Alzheimer’s Fund has surpassed $67 million in research spending and funded more than 300 projects.

Alzheimer’s is the sixth leading cause of death in the US and is the country’s most expensive disease, with care for it and other forms of dementia costing more than $275 billion this year. There are currently 6 million people in the U.S. with Alzheimer’s and nearly 50 million worldwide, and this is expected to triple in the next 30 years.

The Red Sox/Detroit Tigers game featuring Cure Alzheimer’s Fund will take place on Tuesday, June 5th at 7:10 pm.  For more information about the fund, please visit https://curealz.org/.

2017 Holiday Gift Guide Featuring Cure Alzheimer’s Fund and National Braille Press

This holiday season, consumers have the opportunity to buy gifts for friends and family that will make a lasting impact on local charities. We wanted to make sure you were aware of ways to help some of our nonprofit clients through your holiday gift purchases.

Cure Alzheimer’s Fund is a non-profit dedicated to providing grants for the most promising research to prevent, slow or reverse Alzheimer’s disease. Available gifts will support the nonprofit include:

Remember Me nail polish – Los Angeles-based All Heart Cosmetics is offering a limited edition of nail polish named Remember Me. The polish is a red base with tiny gold shimmers with $1 of every bottle sold going to Cure Alzheimer’s Fund. The polish is available for purchase on the company’s website ShopAllHeart.com. PETA and Leaping Bunny proudly certify All Heart Cosmetics’ formula as cruelty free and vegan.

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2013 Joseph Jewell Russian River Valley Chardonnay – Napa Valley’s One Hope Winery will donate proceeds from the sale of a case of its 2013 Joseph Jewell Russian River Valley Chardonnay to Cure Alzheimer’s Fund. One Hope describes the wine as having a caramel green apple aroma with hints of baking spice followed by a creamy finish and is available on the company’s website OneHopeWine.com (while supplies last).

Puzzles to Remember – Kansas City-based puzzle manufacturer Springbok Puzzles, the nation’s largest maker of puzzles, will donate $3 of every puzzle sold in its Puzzles to Remember line to Cure Alzheimer’s Fund. The puzzles are specially designed for those who have memory loss. They are the same overall dimensions as the company’s 500-piece puzzles, but instead contain 36 to 100 pieces. The images and themes of the puzzles are specifically chosen to provide gentle stimulation and positive reinforcement for older adults. The puzzles are available on the company’s website Springbok-Puzzles.com.

Bracelets – Bracelets by Bravelets are designed to help people going through difficult times with 10 percent of the proceeds on select Bravelets products going to Cure Alzheimer’s Fund. According to the company, “all Bravelets jewelry and accessories are symbols of hope, strength and courage,” and are available on the company’s website Bravelets.com.

National Braille Press (NBP) has a selection of unique gift ideas with proceeds going towards helping blind and visually impaired children gain access to braille books. This year, NBP has an array of gifts for sale including jewelry, poetry books, children’s books, self-help books and cards in braille. All items to benefit NBP can be found on its website nbp.org.

In the event consumers can’t find exactly what they are looking for but still want to make an impact with local charities, AmazonSmile is a program where Amazon donates 0.5 percent of the price of eligible AmazonSmile purchases to the charitable organization of a consumer’s choice. Clients that are participating in the AmazonSmile program include Cure Alzheimer’s Fund, St. Francis House, and the Pine Street Inn. St. Francis House is the largest day shelter in Massachusetts and provides services to an average 500 poor and homeless men and women a day. Pine Street Inn provides shelter, housing, and job training services and other services to homeless individuals.  To select your charity, go to smile.amazon.com.

 

Laurie Hernandez Raises Donations for Cure Alzheimer’s Fund to Help Find a Cure for the Disease

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Olympic gold medalist Laurie Hernandez with Barbara Chambers of Cure Alzheimer’s Fund

On Sunday, October 22nd, Olympic gold and silver medalist Laurie Hernandez was in Methuen, Massachusetts at Interstate Gymnastics and Dance, helping to raise donations for Wellesley-based nonprofit Cure Alzheimer’s Fund.

The event was a part of an ongoing series with Hernandez called Gymnastic Funtastic with Laurie Hernandez.  Young gymnasts from across the region raised donations for Cure Alzheimer’s Fund in order to win special prizes with the Dancing with the Stars champion, which included the opportunity to attend a clinic with Hernandez, take a selfie with her, and get her autograph. At a Q&A session, the participants all had the chance to hear her describe the road to the Olympics and how she deals with injury and adversity.

At the event, Hernandez was joined by her mother Wanda Hernandez, who spoke of the importance of raising money to find a cure for Alzheimer’s disease.  In November 2016, just a few months after she won gold and silver at the Rio Olympic Games, Laurie’s grandmother Brunhilda Hernandez passed away from the disease.  Since then, she has spoken publicly about the sadness she experienced because of her grandmother’s death and over the past year, Hernandez has dedicated herself to bringing awareness to the disease.

Barbara Chambers, Cure Alzheimer’s Fund’s Senior Engagement Officer for Marketing & Communications, was on hand to greet Hernandez as well as spend a few minutes talking about the disease and Cure Alzheimer’s Fund’s work providing research dollars to scientists searching for a cure to the young men and women who helped to raise money for the organization.  Just last week, the fund was named by Good Housekeeping Magazine as one of the best charities to give to right now. In total, $8,000 was raised for the organization at the Gymnastic Funtastic event.

Cure Alzheimer’s Fund is a non-profit dedicated to funding the most promising research to prevent, slow or reverse Alzheimer’s disease. Since its founding in 2004, Cure Alzheimer’s Fund has contributed over $55 million to research, and its funded initiatives have been responsible for several key breakthroughs – including the groundbreaking “Alzheimer’s in a Dish” study. Cure Alzheimer’s Fund has received a perfect score of 100 percent regarding its overall financial health from Charity Navigator and a four star rating from the organization for five consecutive years. With 100 percent of funds raised going directly to research, Cure Alzheimer’s Fund has been able to support some of the best scientific minds in the field of Alzheimer’s research. For more information, please visit http://www.curealz.org/.

The President’s Budget Proposal for Fiscal Year 2018 Cuts $294 Million From National Institutes of Aging (NIA)

The Administration has released the President’s budget, now to be considered and modified by Congress. While the President’s budget — no matter who is President — is never the final budget, it does signal strategic intent and policy preferences by the Administration.

Cure Alzheimer’s Fund is deeply concerned about several provisions of this budget, specifically, the approximately 21% cut to the National Institutes of Health in general; and the approximately 36% cut to the National Institute on Aging.

The NIH is the primary funder of basic medical research in the United States. Neither pharmaceutical companies nor philanthropy comes close to the amount of funding provided by the NIH for the basic, necessary research from which virtually all therapies originate.

Progress has been made in recent years to improve funding for NIH and therefore for more high quality basic research into numerous diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease. Cure Alzheimer’s Fund has worked very closely with both Democrats and Republicans in Congress and other Alzheimer’s disease advocacy organizations to champion increases in Alzheimer’s disease research funding at NIH.  Working together, we have all been successful in more than doubling research funding in the last few years to more than $1.4 billion in Fiscal Year 2017 at NIH.  As we have repeatedly said, independent experts have called for $2 billion a year in funding and we are continuing to work with all partners to reach this goal.

The proposed cuts not only threaten this bipartisan progress, but will without a doubt set back and diminish the hard-earned pace of discovery.

Cure Alzheimer’s Fund will continue to work with allies in Congress from both parties to prevent these devastating cuts from becoming reality and ensure robust funding for Alzheimer’s disease research.

Cure Alzheimer’s Fund Saw Significant Growth in Research Spending in 2016

Lab imageLast year, Cure Alzheimer’s Fund, a non-profit organization dedicated to funding the most promising research to prevent, slow or reverse Alzheimer’s disease, saw significant growth in the grants it gave out to researchers who study the disease.  It was yet another indication that we are at a promising moment in bettering our understanding of Alzheimer’s, and developing effective ways to treat it.

The Wellesley-based non-profit provided $13.5 million in research spending grants to medical scientists around the world.  Those grants represent 34 percent growth from the year before in the organization’s research spending. The organization funded 56 projects in four countries in total in 2016.  Since its founding in 2004, Cure Alzheimer’s Fund has surpassed $50 million in research spending, a milestone the organization hit near the end of 2016.

“Our donors are aware that their dollars will go directly to researchers working to find a cure,” said Tim Armour, President and CEO of Cure Alzheimer’s Fund.  “So we’re pleased to let them know that we are supporting some of the most groundbreaking scientific work to address Alzheimer’s disease that is taking place in labs and hospitals across the country and around the world.”

Projects funded in 2016 included a study that will use “big data” methods to examine looking at the relationship between women and the risk for Alzheimer’s disease; research looking at the dynamics between genes, brain activity and the pathology of Alzheimer’s disease; and an examination of the early role of microglia in synapse loss in Alzheimer’s disease. Also in 2016, Cure Alzheimer’s Fund teamed up with Rotary and Move for Minds to co-fund a groundbreaking research project to search for female-specific genetic and other factors contributing to women’s risk for Alzheimer’s disease.

“Individuals and families around the world struggle to deal with the challenges that come with Alzheimer’s disease and other related dementias,” said Dr. Rudy Tanzi, Chair of Cure Alzheimer’s Fund’s Research Consortium. “It is exciting to see how far we’ve come in understanding the nature of Alzheimer’s disease but that excitement is tempered by the knowledge that we have a lot more work to do to develop effective treatments for it.  Cure Alzheimer’s Fund has become an important part of that work.”

In addition to funding crucial projects, Cure Alzheimer’s Fund also provided critical early stage dollars to important research published in 2016.  In May 2016, Drs. Rob Moir and Rudy Tanzi of Harvard Medical School published a study in Science Translational Medicine that suggested that Alzheimer’s disease may arise when the brain perceives itself to be under attack from invading pathogens and launches amyloid formation.  In July 2016, Sangram Sisodia, Ph.D. of the University of Chicago and his co-authors released a paper in Scientific Reports that indicated that treatment with broad spectrum antibiotics over a long period of time decreased the levels of amyloid plaques and triggered the development of inflammatory microglial cells in the brains of mice. Both research projects received grants from Cure Alzheimer’s Fund.

Cure Alzheimer’s Fund is a non-profit dedicated to funding the most promising research to prevent, slow or reverse Alzheimer’s disease. Since its founding in 2004, Cure Alzheimer’s Fund has contributed over $50 million to research, and its funded initiatives have been responsible for several key breakthroughs – including the groundbreaking “Alzheimer’s in a Dish” study. Cure Alzheimer’s Fund has received a score of 100 percent regarding its overall financial health from Charity Navigator and a four star rating from the organization five consecutive times.  With 100 percent of funds raised going directly to research, Cure Alzheimer’s has been able to support some of the best scientific minds in the field of Alzheimer’s research.  For more information, please visit http://www.curealz.org/

Cure Alzheimer’s Fund to Host Major Symposium on Alzheimer’s Disease on October 19th

caf-symposiumCure Alzheimer’s Fund will host its 6th annual symposium at the Boston Public Library on Wednesday, October 19th.  The symposium will focus on New Paths to Discovery and will feature some of the world’s leading researchers on Alzheimer’s disease.

Cure Alzheimer’s Fund is a non-profit dedicated to funding the most promising research to prevent, slow or reverse Alzheimer’s disease. Since its founding in 2004, Cure Alzheimer’s Fund has contributed over $45 million to research, and its funded initiatives have been responsible for several key breakthroughs – including the groundbreaking “Alzheimer’s in a Dish” study. So far this year, the organization has issued more than $6 million in research grants to scientists looking to advance our knowledge of Alzheimer’s disease or to develop effective therapies to treat or cure it.  Since the beginning of the year, the organization has funded 29 projects across the country and around the world, with more grants to come.

The symposium will feature a film screening of four short films focused on living with Alzheimer’s, plus a discussion with award-winning author David Shenk and prize-winning filmmaker Eric Latek.  Additionally, the event will highlight research on new paths to discovery by Duke University’s Murali Doraiswamy, Beth Stevens of Boston Children’s Hospital, and Rudy Tanzi of Massachusetts General Hospital.  Tanzi is the Chair of Cure Alzheimer’s Fund’s Research Consortium and Doraiswamy is a member of the consortium.  There will be a Q&A with the researchers after their presentations.

The symposium is free of charge and members of the public are welcome to attend the film screening, the research presentation or both.  Attendees must register in advance by calling (781) 237-3800 or at this link.

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